News

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Scientists have identified systematic meanders in the northern jet stream that cause simultaneous crop-damaging heat waves in widely separated regions—a previously unknown threat to global food production that could worsen with warming.

Taro Takahashi, a seagoing scientist who made key discoveries about carbon dioxide and the earth’s climate, has died. In a career spanning more than 60 years, he and his colleagues documented how the oceans both absorb and give off huge amounts of carbon dioxide, exchanging it with the atmosphere.

According to new research, the rains that come once the storm has weakened may actually be more intense than when the storm is at its strongest.

On a peninsula within sight of New York City, researchers are studying trees dating as far back as the early 1800s. Rising seas and more powerful storms, both fueled by climate change, could eventually spell their end.

Centuries-old trees on a peninsula near New York City could provide an important record of past storms. Researchers recently traveled there to sample the trees before they are wiped out by rising seas and powerful storms.

A chronological guide to key talks and other events at the Dec. 9-13 American Geophysical Union meeting in San Francisco.

A three-part lecture series will welcome residents of nearby communities to get an up close, exclusive look at Lamont’s world-class research in Palisades, New York.

He treks to remote volcanoes to measure their gas and aerosol emissions, in order to improve climate change predictions.

A small bay in Antarctica has been named after biological oceanographer Hugh Ducklow to celebrate his contributions to Antarctic research.

Typically only shallow wells have arsenic problems, but in an area of India and Bangladesh, deep wells are highly contaminated. Scientists are starting to learn why.

New study challenges many climate scientists’ expectations that plants will make much of the world wetter in the future.

A recent event at Columbia University debated the pros and cons.

New findings double potential emissions from these areas, with big implications for climate modeling.

Kevin Griffin uses remote sensing to track the daily rhythms of trees. His work is helping to bring tree biology to life for students and the general public.