Summer Opportunities: Intern Programs for Undergraduates

Our 2022 Summer Interns, with Dallas Abbott, Mike Kaplan and Graduate Assistant Clara Chang at the far right. Credit: Bill Menke.

Our 2022 Summer Interns, with Dallas Abbott, Mike Kaplan and Graduate Assistant Clara Chang at the far right. Credit: Bill Menke

The Lamont-Doherty summer intern programs offer undergraduates the chance to experience cutting-edge scientific research.

Our Lamont Summer Intern Program is for undergraduates from U.S. colleges and universities. Our Earth Intern Program is for Columbia and Barnard undergraduates.

The application period is typically in January/February, and the programs run early June through early August.

During this experience, interns get to try on research science careers, achieve a level of comfort on a top-level research campus, and establish close personal relationships with mentors who are successful professional scientists. Students work in our lively interdisciplinary research and education communities and are individually mentored by at least one of our scientists over 10 weeks each summer. 

The goals of the program are for students to learn through their own experience what research is like so they can explore research careers; develop self-confidence in their independent research, communication abilities, and scientific identities; and form lasting professional relationships with scientists. 

Research projects are in all areas of Earth, atmospheric, oceanic, and environmental sciences, and follow the diverse disciplinary interests of the students.

2022 program dates: June 1-August 2, 2022

Notice: Application must be received by Feb 23, 2022. (Extended to: Feb 28, 2022 8am ET)

Sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF) Ocean and Earth Sciences REU Sites Program

REU Site at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory

Interdisciplinary Cutting-Edge Research though the Analysis of Global Data

This REU site at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory has offered internships for more than two decades. Funding is provided by the US National Science Foundation (Arlington, Virginia) and is contingent upon their continued support.

The Lamont-Doherty contacts for the REU are Dr. Dallas Abbott (845-596-1131) and Dr. Michael Kaplan; please direct all questions to them. The NSF contact for the REU Site program is Program Manager Dr. Lisa Rom (703-292-7709). NSF does not handle REU applications; please contact each REU site directly for application information.

The Lamont-Doherty Summer Intern Program offers the chance to experience scientific research as an undergraduate. The program is open to US citizens or permanent residents who have completed their junior or sophomore year in college or community college with majors in earth science, environmental science, chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, or engineering. Neither graduating seniors nor international students are eligible for this internship. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.

If possible, the internship will be held in-person at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University’s Earth and Environmental Science campus in Palisades New York, with students being housed in a nearby college dormitory.  However, should the Covid-19 Pandemic prevent an in-person program, it will be held remotely, following the model of the very successful 2020 and 2021 remote programs.

Applicants should have an interest in conducting research in the Earth, Ocean, Atmospheric, and Environmental Sciences. Two previous college-level courses in one or more of these areas are desirable if they are available to the student. All students are preferred to have at least one year of calculus (high school or college) and/or good grades in college level mathematics. Students choosing research in geochemistry and chemical oceanography should have at least two semesters of college-level chemistry; in marine biology at least two semesters of college-level biology; and in geophysics should have at least two semesters of college-level physics. However, exceptions may be made in cases where the applicant’s college does not offer appropriate courses.

The program features:

  • A hands-on research project under the supervision of a Columbia-affiliated scientist;
  • Opportunities to discuss science with both experts and peers;
  • Training in data analysis techniques, using software environments such as GeoMapApp, R, Matlab, and Python;
  • Training in lab safety, professional ethics, and career opportunities;
  • Special lectures, workshops, and field trips;
  • Free housing in a Dominican college dormitory;
  • Ten-week stipend of $6000.

For more information and to view the listing of advisors and projects, review these documents completely before filling out the application:

In order to be able to access and complete the online application form properly, you need to have:

  • The latest version of Firefox, Internet Explorer, or Safari as your browser (STRONGLY recommended).
  • Javascript and Cookies turned on in your browser. Normally, these are on by default.
  • Your resume completed and saved as a PDF file.
  • Your top three choices for advisor. You will be asked to specify them in the application.

If you have trouble with the above requirements, please contact the webmaster.

APPLY NOW

Earth Intern Program for Columbia University and Barnard Undergraduates

2022 program dates: June 1-August 3, 2022

Notice: Application must be received by Feb 23rd, 2022. (Extended to: Feb 28, 2022 8am ET)

Sponsored by the Earth Institute, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Barnard College, Columbia College, and the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences at Columbia University

The Earth Intern Program offers the chance to experience scientific research as an undergraduate. The program is open to all Columbia College, Columbia Engineering, Columbia General Studies, and Barnard College students who have completed their junior or sophomore year in college with majors (or anticipated majors) in earth science, environmental science, chemistry, biology, physics, mathematics, engineering, sustainable development, or political science. Graduating seniors are not eligible. Minorities and women are encouraged to apply.

Applicants should have an interest in conducting research in the Earth, atmospheric, or ocean sciences. Completion of at least two courses in Earth, atmospheric, or ocean sciences is desirable. All students are preferred to have at least one year of calculus (high school or college) and/or good grades in college-level mathematics. Students undertaking research in geochemistry and chemical oceanography are required to have at least two semesters of college-level chemistry. Students undertaking research in marine biology are required to have at least two semesters of college-level biology. Students undertaking research in geophysics should have at least three semesters of college-level physics.

The program features:

  • A hands-on research project under the supervision of a Columbia-affiliated scientist;
  • Special lectures, workshops, and field trips;
  • Free housing in a Domincan College dormitory;
  • Ten-week stipend of $6000.

For more information and to view the listing of advisors and projects, review these documents completely before filling out the application:

In order to be able to access and complete the online application form properly, you need to have

  • The latest version of Firefox, Internet Explorer, or Safari as your browser (STRONGLY recommended).
  • Javascript and Cookies turned on in your browser. Normally, these are on by default.
  • Your resume completed and saved as a PDF file.
  • Your top three choices for advisor. You will be asked to specify them in the application.

If you have trouble with the above requirements, please contact the webmaster.

APPLY NOW

Past Interns

Alexia Alejos

Alexia Alejos, Columbia University
Mentors: Jordan Abell, Gisela Winkler    

Characterizing Southern Hemisphere Westerly Winds Over the Marine Isotope Stage 8 to 7 Transition – Abstract and Slide

Malik T. Atadzhanov

Malik T. Atadzhanov, Kingsborough Community College
Mentors: Dallas Abbott, Karin Block     

Constraining the Timing and Chemical Composition of the Mid Sixth Century Submarine Volcanic Eruptions Between 45 North and 30 South – Abstract and Slide

Kristen L. Avery

Kristen L. Avery, Tompkins Cortland Community College    
Mentors: Christopher Lepre, Paul Olsen    

What Can the Geochemical Variations in Ancient Stromatolites Tell Us About Climate Variability in Eastern Africa? – Abstract and Slide

Grace A. Brown

Grace A. Brown, Barnard College
Mentor: Yutian Wu    

The Interannual Variability of Carbon Monoxide in the Upper Troposphere-Lower Stratosphere Over the Asian Summer Monsoon Region – Abstract and Slide

Amanda J. Chen

Amanda J. Chen, Wellesley College
Mentors: Benjamin Bostick, Sidney Hemming    

Examining Mineralogical Variations Through ODP Site 959 in the Gulf of Guinea – Abstract and Slide

Ashley Dann

Ashley Dann, University of Florida    
Mentors: Steve Goldberg, Angela Slagle     

CO2 Storage and Hydrate Stability: A Comparison of Offshore Basaltic Reservoirs – Abstract and Slide

Tania DaSilva

Tania DaSilva, Dominican College of Blauvelt
Mentors: Clara Chang, Paul Olsen, Sean Kinney, Christopher Lepre    

Quantitative Analysis of Modern Fish Kills and Fossil Fish: Algae Rafting in the Fossil Record – Abstract and Slide

Connor Diaz

Connor Diaz, Columbia University School of General Studies    
Mentors: Mingfang Ting, Radley Horton

Occupational Health Risk to Agricultural Workers From Humid Heat – Abstract and Slide

Shriya A. Fruitwala

Shriya A. Fruitwala, Haverford College
Mentors: Chia-Ying Lee, Suzana Camargo

Analyzing the Record-Breaking 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season – Abstract and Slide

Fernando D. Fuentes

Fernando D. Fuentes, LaGuardia Community College
Mentor: Bill Menke

Can Earthquakes Be Induced by Thermal Expansion or Chemical Expansion Affecting Stress in the Earth? – Abstract and Slide

Olivia M. Gadson

Olivia M. Gadson, Georgetown University
Mentors: Lloyd Anderson, Natalie Umling 

Investigating Shell Thickness and Preservation in Two Species of Planktonic Foraminifera Over Millions of Years – Abstract and Slide

Herman Garcia

Herman Garcia, The City College of New York
Mentors: Yuxian Zhou, Jerry McManus    

Utilizing Stable Isotopes to Reconstruct Ocean Circulation During the Last 150 Kyrs in the North Atlantic – Abstract and Slide

Cyril M. Gilman

Cyril M. Gilman, Columbia College, Columbia University
Mentors: Suzana Camargo, Chia-Ying Lee, Dan Westervelt, Arlene Fiore     

Effects of Anthropogenic European So2 Emissions on North Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Behavior – Abstract and Slide

Annika R. Gonzales

Annika R. Gonzales, California State University, Long Beach
Mentors: Michael Kaplan, Ángel Muñoz, Steven Goldstein, Sidney Hemming    

Connecting Changes in Volcanic Activity to Glacial-Climates Over the Last ~6 Ma From Central America to the Central Andes - Abstract and Slide
 

Karine L. Holmes

Karine L. Holmes, Iowa State University
Mentors: Celeste Pallone, Jerry McManus

Multispecies Foraminifera Reconstruction of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific Thermocline During the Holocene and Last Glacial Interval – Abstract and Slide

Ellen M. Jorgensen

Ellen M. Jorgensen, Syracuse University
Mentors: Yuxian Zhou, Jerry McManus     

Contextualizing North Atlantic Sediment within Heinrich Events – Abstract and Slide

Ashley Lambert

Ashley Lambert, College of Staten Island
Mentor: Jerry McManus

Did Iceberg Discharge in the Labrador Sea Influence Climate or Ocean Circulation Since the End of the Last Ice Age – Abstract and Slide

Madison Mahan

Madison Mahan, University of Maine 
Mentor: Susanne Straub

A Temporal Record of Plio-Pleistocene Volcanism of the Kurile-Kamchatka Arc From Odp Site 881, Northwest Pacific – Abstract and Slide

Tavehon J. McGarry

Tavehon J. McGarry, Columbia University
Mentors: Craig Connolly, Ben Bostick

Analyzing Relationship Between Environmental Conditions and Arsenic Absorption in Rice – Abstract and Slide

Katelyn R. McPaul

Katelyn R. McPaul, Columbia University
Mentors: Martin Stute, William Smethie    

Improving Measurement of Nitrogen, Argon, and Oxygen in the Ocean Using Gas Chromatography – Abstract and Slide

Sera M. Ndure

Sera M. Ndure, Housatonic Community College
Mentors: Kailani Acosta, Andrew Juhl

Do Monthly to Inter-Annual Rainfall Patterns Affect the Abundance of Sewage Bacteria in the Hudson River (NY,USA)? – Abstract and Slide

Olivia C. Pfetsch

Olivia C. Pfetsch, Columbia University
Mentor: Andreas Thurnherr    

Exploring Connections Between Seafloor Topography and the Structure of the Bottom Boundary Layer – Abstract and Slide

Ellen Ren

Ellen Ren, Barnard College
Mentors: Qiang Yang, Steve Chillrud

Correction for PurpleAir PM2.5 Data in the NYC area – Abstract and Slide

Charlotte Rhoads

Charlotte Rhoads, Vassar College
Mentor: Bill Menke

Does Supplementing Travel Time Data with Amplitude Data improve Geo-tomographic Determinations of Earth Structure? – Abstract and Slide

Bryn E. Stecher

Bryn E. Stecher, Barnard College
Mentors: Allie Balter-Kennedy, Joerg Shaefer 

Holocene Deglaciation History of the Juneau Icefield, Southeastern Alaska, Using Cosmogenic 10Be – Abstract and Slide

Emily M. Stone

Emily M. Stone, Barnard College
Mentor: Dorothy Peteet

Late Glacial to Holocene Climate Shifts as Revealed by Vegetational Macrofossil Reconstruction, Maplecrest Bog, Catskill Mountains, New York – Abstract and Slide

Anzim S. Sultan

Anzim S. Sultan, City College of New York
Mentors: Dallas Abbott, Steven Jaret, Karin Block    

Age and Composition of Holocene Tropical Submarine Volcanoes in the Equatorial and North Pacific – Abstract and Slide

Oumou D. Traore

Oumou D. Traore, Hostos Community College
Mentors: Paul Olsen, Clara Chang, Sean Kinney

What Can Inherited Zircons Tell Us About the Origins of The Central Atlantic Magmatic Province and Its Transit Through the Earth’s Crust? – Abstract and Slide

Felicia R. Trebian

Felicia R. Trebian, Navajo Technical University
Mentors: Paul Olsen, Clara Chang, Sean Kinney    

Translation of Orbital Pacing to Climate at a Transitory Interval of Low Co2 During the Dawn of the Dinosaurs – Abstract and Slide

Savannah M. Ward

Savannah M. Ward, Columbia University
Mentor: Dan Westervelt    

NOₓ and PM2.5 Measurements with Low Cost Sensors and Reference Monitors at a High Traffic Site in Nairobi, Kenya. – Abstract and Slide