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Maybe you already know that she created some of the first maps of the ocean floor and helped discover plate tectonics. Here are some lesser-known facts about this history-making cartographer.

On the 100th anniversary of her birth, her grit and brilliance are as legendary as her work.

The pioneering mapmaker explains how she and colleagues discovered underwater mountain ranges 40,000 miles long, and helped to prove that the continents move.

July 30 marks 100 years since the birth of Marie Tharp, a pioneering geologist who created some of the first maps of the ocean floor. We’re celebrating her achievements and legacy with blog posts, giveaways, and more.

The Secondary School Field Research Program offers a diverse group of young people a unique opportunity to do field and laboratory research.

Researchers at Columbia are developing an app that Guinean communities can use to hold mining companies accountable for controlling the dust they produce, which can harm health and livelihoods.

GreenDrill promises to reveal the ice sheet’s past in unprecedented detail and enable more accurate predictions of how it may add to rising seas in the 21st century.

Climate change is already part of the curricula across Columbia, but we can make a bigger difference by working together.

Scientists at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory use models and observations to understand tropical storms and advance the science of predicting them.

New study estimates that a ton of lead dust may have been deposited in parks, homes, and schools near the cathedral.

Interest in deep-sea mining for metals has grown substantially in the last decade. A new study argues that it poses significant risks not only to the immediate surroundings, but also to the water hundreds to thousands of feet above the seafloor.

To find out how volcanoes in the Pacific Ocean influence earthquakes and tsunamis, a team of scientists listens for ‘echoes’ from under the sea.

Un nuevo Atlas Sudamericano de Sequía revela que las sequías severas expandidas y los períodos inusualmente húmedos sin precedentes han ido aumentando desde mediados del siglo XX.

A new South American Drought Atlas reveals that unprecedented widespread, intense droughts and unusually wet periods have been on the rise since the mid-20th century.

Climate change will intensify winds that steer hurricanes north over Texas in the late 21st century, increasing the odds for fast-moving storms like 2008’s Ike, compared with slow-movers like 2017’s Harvey, says new research.