News

Wrapping up a week-long bicycle trip that has brought climate science to underprivileged schools.

Using drones, laser scanners, and high-resolution models, researchers hope to find out more about the processes driving rapid melting in this region.

A PhD student explains what life is like on a week-long bicycle trip that’s bringing climate science to students from economically disadvantaged families.

This year’s Open House attracted more than 3,000 visitors and, just like research at Lamont, covered a vast range of subjects and regions, from under the sea to the surface of the moon.

Sonya Dyhrman, a microbial oceanographer affiliated with Lamont’s Center for Climate and Life, explains how human-caused climate change is harming ocean health.

A student-led Cycle for Science trip will follow the footsteps of an ice sheet that buried the NYC area under a mile of ice during the last ice age.

A paleoecologist explains why it’s actually a bad idea to “drain the swamp.”

Walter Pitman, a seagoing geophysicist who spotted a crucial piece of a huge puzzle that revolutionized the earth sciences, has died.

Visit us in Palisades, NY, for hands-on, family-friendly science activities and lectures — including a new panel that will address the challenges of reporting the climate story.

Short answer: Moderation is key.

In a hearing of the House Science Committee, the meteorologist weighed in on heatwaves and hurricanes, and underscored the need for action.

With help from local tv station Univision 41, Earth Institute scientists tested how well Newark’s lead filters are working. The results support new findings from city officials.

Pierre Dutrieux, a Lamont-Doherty oceanographer and 2019 Climate and Life Fellow, discusses his Antarctic research and what the new IPCC report says about sea level rise.

Climate change disrupts the water cycle in ways that could profoundly alter how we live our lives.

Researchers warn that world leaders are being misled by economic assessments of future climate-change impacts.