News

Although emissions temporarily dipped due to coronavirus, the numbers are bouncing back quickly as economies reopen.

A scientist reflects on the potential harms of chasing whales with boats to try to get that perfect snapshot.

Previously unrecognized structural lines deep in the earth appear to signal the locations of giant deposits of copper, lead, zinc and other vital metals near the surface.

The environmental tragedy does not stop even in the face of the pandemic. From January to April, over 1200 square kilometers of forest were wiped out.

A student group examined the types of microplastics entering the river, and created a way for citizen scientists to help with the research.

Women and people of color are historically underrepresented in the geosciences. Through two different diversity initiatives, graduate student Kailani Acosta is working to change that.

Research by Center for Climate and Life Fellow Pierre Dutrieux will lead to greater understanding of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet’s future stability and associated sea level rise.

In a century or two, future generations will be able to ‘read’ the pandemic chapter in ice cores — if glaciers still exist then.

Social distancing and mask-wearing are here to stay for the foreseeable future. This guide will help you safely disinfect and reuse some types of disposable masks.

Raymo is a world-renowned marine geologist and climate scientist whose work focuses on the history and causes of past climate change.

A simple fascination with winter and weather patterns led D’Arrigo to become a globe-trotting scientist who collects and analyzes important data from tree rings.

On Wednesday, the State of the Planet blog will be going silent in solidarity with a grassroots movement to eradicate anti-Black racism in academia and STEM.

With less pollution entering the air, our waterways are getting cleaner. Whether or not they stay that way is up to us.

Pollution is going down, but temperatures could still rise. Here’s why.

Climate scientist Suzana Camargo shares some cautionary words.