Laurel Noelani-Reiko Zaima

Laurel Zaima is the Education and Outreach Coordinator at Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory. Laurel has substantial experience working with youth, teaching students through informal education about the natural environment through hands-on experiences since 2015.

At Lamont, she works on education initiatives that communicate science research to the general public, K-12 and undergraduate school groups, and New York and New Jersey teachers. Her primary educational focus is on connecting people to the Hudson River and their local waterways by using a place-based instructional approach with an emphasis on field explorations. She also teaches about sustainability, climate change, and sea level rise with a strong emphasis on the changes occurring in the polar regions. Laurel has led and advised high school and undergraduate students through Lamont's summer research opportunities including the Secondary School Field Research Program (SSFRP) and Next Generation of Hudson River Educators Program.

In addition, Laurel serves as the U.S. Board President and instructor of the Terranaut Club, a non-profit organization that is committed to providing science and environmental education opportunities for young women and gender minorities through immersive experiences in STEM and nature.

Fields of Interest

Marine and Estuarine Science, Coastal and Ocean Sustainability, Climate Science, Climate Education, Polar Geophysics, Polar Education, Place-based Education, Environmental Justice

Education

  • University of Miami, B.S. Marine Science and Biology (2015) 
  • Columbia University, M.S. Sustainability Science (Expected Graduation 2021)

Turrin, M., Allan, E., Stock, J., Zaima, L. (2020). It Takes a ‘Superhero’ to Uncover the Climate Secrets in Fossilized Arctic Ocean Dinocysts. The Journal of Marine Education, vol. 34, no. 1. 

Tanenbaum, J., Fenton, J., Knudson, C., Laible, N., Rosamilia, B., Turrin, M., Zaima, L. (2021). Earth Day at Cottage Lane: A Local, Affordable, Outdoor-Education- Day Model for Your School or Setting. The Earth Scientist, 37(1), 4-9.